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proclus : Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
Now that my eyes have been sensitized to dryness for the very first time in my life, I think that I can describe something I would call parsley eyes.  They are apparently a little dryer than what they normally would be, even without any anti-histamine.  In fact, my eyes have returned to normal, though perhaps occasionally on the dry side of normal.  On my bicycle this morning, it was clear that my wet winter nose had returned.  The stye is gone, and I stopped the niacin a day or two ago.  Of course, the dryness would be linked to the CFTR blockade from the parsley regimen, but it also appears that a normal dose of anti-histamine was far too much, when combined with the parsley.  I think that a few doses of niacin helped the stye recovery immensely, and now I think I am in the normal range, better than I was before.

This experience has taught me very much about the interplay between flavonoids and histamine.  In the future, I may experiment with a very low dose of anti-histamine, which may be beneficial, if you can find one with high H1 receptor selectivity.    Now that the dry eyes has been solved, I will be continuing with the parsley regimen for the foreseeable.  There are just too many benefits from high dose polyphenol to give the parsley up, besides the fact that it is delicious.

This would be a good time to reiterate concerns around the use of flavonoid and polyphenol supplements with respect to development; pregnancy, nursing, and little children.  As I have previously pointed out these concerns, I would only wish to indicate this caveat.  For example, some women are using parsley in an attempt to restore or regularize menstruation.  I don’t know if it is effective, but if so, then there could obviously be a danger of miscarriage during pregnancy or worse. 

Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

Published Friday, February 05, 2010 04:05 PM by proclus

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proclus : Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
Yesterday I realized that people with allergies might like to try the parsley regimen.  I have definitely had dry eyes and nose as a result of using this much parsley, and I think I actually developed an eye stye because of it.  Of course, this speaks to the histamine connection.  I had been taking an anti-histamine for atopic cough and runny nose, which are allergy-like symptoms, and it appears that the parsley regimen has eliminated that problem.  Because of the stye, I stopped the anti-histamine, so that I would have more tears, and I have started taking niacin again, which I intend to do until the stye is gone.  Today I have tears in my eyes, so that it appears that the combination of parsley regimen and anti-histamine was too strong for me.  This is still preliminary in my case, but it would be wonderful if people could use parsley to reduce their allergy symptoms, and reduce or eliminate their anti-histamine use as indicated.  It is clear that many who suffer from allergies or related problems would like to give this a try in order to get some relief.  Parsley apigenin has been demonstrated to reduce cell invasiveness, which is a big part of the allergy problem and cancer too.  My atopic cough is far better after two weeks of this parsley regimen.  Research relates atopic cough directly to immune system invasion in the trachea.  Perhaps we can add this parsley regimen to the body of allergy information and remedies.  Time will tell.  More later.
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Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

The blog

MOD

  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Published Tuesday, February 02, 2010 09:47 AM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/2/1072.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Posted via web from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »

    proclus : Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
    Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
    This is another late night quick update on several items.  I managed to isolate the effects of the flax oil with lignan fraction formulations, and I am checking off.  I could not detect any increase in blood pressure, or any decongestant effect either.  It is likely that this is a most healthful oil formulation, second only to certain fish oils.

    I think that the lignans add a little bitter taste to this oil, which is comparable to some olive oils that may be similar, but I recommend the flax oil anyway.  Cooking and acidic foods are likely to create something deeply pleasant from the bitters.  In fact, I have a recipe for this below.

    Before proceeding to the recipe, I would like to point out a problem with citrus bioflavonoids, like hesperidin and naringinin.  Although citrus fruits typically have hundreds of milligrams of these beneficial substances, they are not absorbed well into the body.  In fact, the absorption is terrible, in spite of the high vitamin C content of the fruit.  One reason for this may be that people tend to wolf citrus fruits down without chewing, and I recommend small, well-chewed bites.  I have also applied some biochemical insights and kitchen wizardry to make a recipe that attempts to address this problem.

    Again, before proceeding to the recipe itself, I need to point out that this citrus pudding has a very unusual ingredient, fresh ground pepper.  Like the flax oil bitters, this spice takes on a very different and rich taste in the acidic pudding mixture.  Here is the recipe.

    Juice two citrus fruits, and save the pulp.  Set the juice aside, or drink it as you like.  It is not a part of the pudding.  The vast majority of healthful fiber and flavanoids are found in the pulp.  Be sure to juice vigorously all the way to the peel.  Put the pulp in a soup bowl, and add 1/2 teaspoon of vegetable oil.  I am recommending the flax oil because of the high omega 3  and lignan content.  Add 1/2 teaspoon of fresh ground pepper, and a large heaping tablespoon full of yogurt.  Make sure that you have the kind with live cultures, because this will aid in the digestion of the fiber and absorption of the flavonoids.  Like the flax lignans, this is very healthful fiber, and it is helpful to find a way to digest it.  Stir the pudding to a thick uniform mixture, then enjoy your delicious treat.

    I recommend experimenting with more pepper.  The combination of citric acid and emulsion will remove any unpleasant taste, and like the other ingredients, the pepper may aid in absorption of the citrus bioflavanoids.  Be sure and use fine ground fresh pepper.

    If you have recommendations for this new recipe, be sure and post them.  I am anxious to try them.  I am really enjoying my citrus this way, and I promise a big wet kiss to anyone who can prove that it does not improve the absorption of these crucial nutrients.  Enjoy your pudding.  It is very filling and satisfying.

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    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/


    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols, first round results
  • Michael L. Love: Tryosol Lignins
  • Michael L. Love: Bisphenol Molecules Structural Archive and Gallery
  • Michael L. Love: Nano baby doll house music maker
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz
    Published Sunday, January 10, 2010 08:03 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/10/898.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Posted via web from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »