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Michael L. Love: Seafood notes

I grabbed the following information from my Amazon Seafood Wishlist, because I thought that it deserved more visibiltiy. The healthful benefits of seafood are widely noted.  I am searching for seafood which is low in mercury, high in DHA, and high in astaxanthin, and found that red salmon fills the bill.

DHA is one of the beneficial unsaturated omega 3 fatty acids, which is already widely known for its healthful benefits, and sure to be rising in prominence as well.  Caviar is probably one of the best sources of DHA, far and away, and the red variety is also likely rich in astaxanthin, while the black variety is rich in melanin compounds, which are also likely to be healthful.  One must be wary however of the food colorings that are used to produce the color in less expensive caviar.  Due caution, and more information is needed.  I have written an Amazon Guide about this.  I am looking for inexpensive caviar that is also low in food coloring.  See the wishlist for some examples.  There are additional notes about some of the inexpensive caviars in the images section.  I am projecting that the simple unprocessed salmon roe will be the best.  Astaxanthin is a carotene-like nutrient that is only available from red fish and certain shell fishes, such as shrimp.  I have been told that shrimp are fed to fish in order to deepen their beneficial redness.

Sodium salt is a problem with seafood, but the benefits probably outweigh this problem, especially if you eliminate salt from other parts of your diet.  Sodium is a particular problem for caviar, and it is probably unwise to eat unrinsed caviar.  Better than rinsing, desalt the caviar.  The eggs desalt rapidly because of their small size, and it improves the taste considerably.  Don’t use too much water though, because it will leach out the DHA.  Just add enough water to cover over the eggs, stir gently to break up the clumps, let stand for a few minutes, then drain and rinse.  Enjoy your caviar and salmon!One more thing for Weight Loss Vitacosters, I have found that substituting red salmon and citrus fruits for calorie dense foods has reduced my hunger pangs considerably.  Clearly, the salmon can be expected to be very satisfying.  I have lost several pounds as a result of this change.  I restrict the salmon to a heaping tablespoonful per meal, twice per day, which still provides a substantial amount of the mentioned nutrients.

Regards,
proclus
http://www.gnu-darwin.org/
The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
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    Posted Tuesday, Dec 22, 2009 1:01 PM by proclus

    Posted via email from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »

    Michael L. Love: Thai Black Rice update
    I thought that the Vitacost community might be interested in the latest snippet from the Molecules site news, featuring Vitacost and this blog.
    For those who are following the activism aspect of the Molecules site, I thought that you might be interested in a little pre-history as it were. Prior to the founding of the Molecules site, the activism first hatched under the GNU-Darwin umbrella, and the fundamental idea of molecules activism was invented. Initially, it was concerned primarily with resveratrol and other caloric restriction memetics, but it was clearly bound to expand from there. You can read some of the early material in the GNU-Darwin Posts regarding resveratrol and calorie restriction. As was previously mentioned, the ideas were formally developed in the FOSS, Science, and Public activism essay, and it was even put forth as a war protest in the so-called bootstrapping essay. As the Molecules site developed, it became clear that additional adjunct activities were required in order to push the activism harder. One of these adjuncts was created on the Vitacost website, where it is easy to provide directed links to crucial molecules for those who want to obtain them for themselves. Moreover, the activism ideas continue to evolve there in blog format. Check it out: Michael L. Love proclus Blog on Vitacost.

    Tonight I found some very satisfying news related to all of this. One of the last few GNU-Darwin posts regarding resveratrol and caloric restriction referred to the very high anthocyanin content of the forbidden Thai black rice. You can read about that in the link above. At the time that I wrote the post there was virtually no product development around the black rice, but now I am happy to learn that there are many such products. Several can be found on the Vitacost website. Obviously, I cannot take any credit for this marvellous development, but the success is consistent with the activism ideas that I have been developing. There are many examples of such successes, some of them are documented in a free software activism article that I wrote several years ago. The implications are pretty far reaching. For more examples, check out this page on GNU-Darwin, or the links page and personal page of this blog. We also should consider the possibility that thinking in similar veins together makes great minds out of us. Of course the internet itself seems pre-designed for that sort of activism. Cheers!

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/
    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
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    Posted Monday, Dec 28, 2009 9:28 PM by proclus

    Posted via email from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »

    proclus : Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
    Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
    I am following up with research on some of the foods on the list, particularly the ones that I am less familiar with. So I started with rutabagas, and this humble vegetable is taking far longer to research than I expected, which mostly explains why I haven’t posted recently. There is rapeseed oil, canola, Monsanto, turnip greens, and much much more; each with research forks. It is really a marvellous subject, and there will likely be more in the future about this, but that is unfortunately all that I can say for now. I’ll leave you with one of the more interesting references that I turned up, related to autism and iodine. Cheers!

    Autism: transient in utero hypothyroxinemia related to maternal flavonoid ingestion during pregnancy and to other environmental antithyroid agents.


    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz
    Published Saturday, January 09, 2010 12:00 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/9/896.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Posted via web from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »

    proclus : Michael L. Love: writing and riding
    Michael L. Love: writing and riding
    I have been busy writing. Some of it may appear here eventually. It is unclear to me that community members are interested in broader personal information, other than that which is focused on one of the four main interest categories. And I am inclined at this time to put such information elsewhere. Such is the case with the article I wrote today.

    Google, user interests, and biasing factors
    http://proclus.gnu-darwin.org/google-bias.html

    Data from the community blog post tables assisted my conclusions. That is how I spent my morning. There is more in the pipe, such as some autobiographical information. I am currently thinking that community members are less interested in topics that do not fall strictly under the four goal/interest categories. Which is the main reason I have been posting such material elsewhere. I think that this article is germane to anyone who wants to promote their blog, which many in the community might find helpful. It is like the code I developed for blog extraction, and I am posting to all four groups because of this fact.

    I split my bicycle rim this week, and I will likely spend the afternoon spoking it out. This problem is due to the magnesium, which is much softer than conventional bicycle materials. Other bicycles would be less expensive, more reliable, and stronger, as I describe in the winter bicycling articles. This is the disadvantage of riding in style, but I think that the advantages outweigh the disadvantages. The light weight and attention-getting appearance are the main advantages of this ultra-light bicycle. The crucial action is that people see the bicyclist. In addition to promoting the sport, it is good for the continued health and well being of the rider, as well as the writer.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/


    The blog

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  • Michael L. Love: blogging, facebook, and Radical Mormon
  • Michael L. Love: aspirin hiatus
  • Michael L. Love: citrus pudding recipe
  • Michael L. Love: parsley recipe alert!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and bone loss
  • Michael L. Love: I Love You!
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies follow-up
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and allergies
  • Michael L. Love: parsley and triglycerides
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley odyssey continues
  • Michael L. Love: Community blog to rss extraction code
  • Michael L. Love: winter bicycling
  • Michael L. Love: more parsley info, anti-diarrhea and other matters
  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
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    Published Saturday, February 27, 2010 02:27 PM by proclus

    Read more at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/2/27/1203.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Posted via web from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »

    proclus : Michael L. Love: Tyrosol Lignins
    Michael L. Love: Tyrosol Lignins
    I would like to share my intitial impressions regarding tyrosol and lignins.  I finally got a chance to try a couple of products containing these substances, and I was able to do a little checking, including some blood pressure measurements.  I am borderline prehypertensive for various reasons, many of which are harmless, but I like to keep an eye on it.  It should be noted that these impressions are preliminary, empirical, and anecdotal.

    Lignins are a highly varied and often complex molecular species, so that it should always be inquired as to what type of lignans are being referred to.  I am convinced that lignan molecules can be expected to be at the frontier of longevity medicine.  It is no surprise that there is much excitement around these compounds, which have good free radical quenching capabilities, and similar structures to other polyphenolic compounds, which have been demonstrated to have enormously healthful benefits.

    Tyrosol is another molecule which shares in the same interesting properties as lignans in the general sense, and in fact, many lignans are based on tyrosol.  These include the lignins in flax and olive.  Tyrosol has been demonstrated to have similar beneficial qualities, but it is also deserving of certain caveats, as are the tyrosol lignan class in general.

    Tyrosol and tyrosol lignans are included in certain nasal and throat spray preparations, and it is not surprising that they exhibit a decongestant-like property, due to their similar structure to adenergic molecules, such as norepinephrine.  In fact, tyrosol has been demonstrated to have antiarrhythmic effects, which could be beneficial for some people.  This is consistent with alpha-1 adenergic activation, and explains the decongestant effect as well.

    At this juncture, I would like to remind that these are preliminary findings, and people should search out the matter in the literature for themselves.  My research is indicating at this time that alpha-1 activation is not beneficial from a longevity perspective, and is likely to cause harm to people with rapid heartbeat or high blood pressure.  One reason for this is the resulting Akt activation, which you can look up for yourself.  I try to avoid alpha-1 activation, which is a stress response.  For this reason, I have until now tried to avoid decongestant medicines, which are typically alpha-1 adenergics.

    Tyrosol shares its molecular properties with norepinephrin, the body’s native alpha-1 receptor ligand, and as such it can be expected that there are ameliorating factors which offset the problems.  Although, alpha-1 activation may lead to runaway calcium cascades, tyrosine kinase activation, and an increase in inflammatory factors, these effects which are often adverse are offset by the phenolic structure of the molecule, which may tend to scavange the resulting free radicals and produce some of the other benefits that are associated with polyphenols, like resveratrol.

    My advice at this time is to use discretion and moderation when supplementing with tyrosol and tyrosol lignins.  Consider the state of your health.  Personally, with borderline prehypertension, I will tend to use less than some other people.  For example, I will use the topical and intranasal preparations only as needed.  I have the flax oil with lignan fraction preparation from NSI, and I think that it could be beneficial, but due to these concerns, I will limit myself to an occasional 1/2 teaspoon.  I like it in my yogurt fruit smoothie, and it tastes better than olive oil in the juice.  Much more could obviously be said about olive oils.  Anyway, for people with low blood pressure and/or adverse congestion and swelling in the nasal epithelium, the effects may be more beneficial.

    Adenergics are frequently a part of body building regimens, and I would advice caution.  There are beta-adenergic agonists, which are probably more on target and effective than the alpha-1 agonists.  Moreover, they can be expected to be more heathful in the general sense as well.

    I am afraid that I am always eager to try the hottest new supplement, in order to expand my longevity program, and as a result, I do not always proceed with scientific rigor.  I find myself backpedalling from time to time, which is why I put the caveats on this piece.  I must confess that the observed effects could be due to a change in my vitamin E regimen, but I find that unlikely. 

    For the future, I think that tannins are in a similar preliminary state as lignins.  There are huge potential benefits, but an equal degree of concerns.  I hope that this information helps someone, and I will post updates as I learn more.

    Incidentally, for those concerned about high blood pressure, you might want to have a look at forskolin.  It is available in herbal extract form  from NSI.  I recommend a strict regimen when using forskolin, in order to avoid the rollercoaster effect.  It would probably be wise to consult with a healthcare professional about it.  I will probably have more to say about this later, as it is related to this story above.

    Finally,  I would like to boost another new idea.  I think that phenolics which are not alpha-1 adenergic would be a better addition to an intranasal spray.  It would not give users that familiar punch, but it would be more benefical in the long run.  There are many naturally occuring flavonoids, which are known to have beneficial antimicrobal activity, and it should not be difficult to find the best one, perhaps among the citrus variety.  In a suspension with a little citric acid to lower the pH and aid absorption, it could be quite beneficial and effective, without the alpha-1 body load… BTW, for the throat spray too.

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    The blog

    MOD

  • Michael L. Love: Parsley recipe
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols and stable free radicals
  • Michael L. Love: some bio info, blog links, plus some molecules site news
  • Michael L. Love: USDA Database for the Flavonoid Content
  • Michael L. Love: recipe; flax oil, tyrosol lignans update
  • Michael L. Love: rutabagas odyssey
  • Michael L. Love: polyphenols, first round results
  • Michael L. Love: Tryosol Lignins
  • Michael L. Love: Bisphenol Molecules Structural Archive and Gallery
  • Michael L. Love: Nano baby doll house music maker
  • Michael L. Love: Molecules Activism on Vitacost: Thai Black Rice update
  • Michael L. Love: Antifungal nasal spray
  • Michael L. Love: Merry Christmas Vitacost Community!
  • Michael L. Love: more on the polyphenol story
  • Michael L. Love: Seafood notes
  • Michael L. Love: Polyphenols, etc
  • Michael L. Love: Linus Pauling
  • Michael L. Love: First entry
  • Follow Michael L. Love:
    on Google Buzz
    Published Friday, January 01, 2010 07:06 PM by proclus

    Read More at Vitacost blogs.
    http://blogs.vitacost.com/Blogs/proclus/Archive/2010/1/1/849.aspx

    Regards,
    proclus
    http://www.gnu-darwin.org/

    Posted via web from proclus-gnu-darwin’s posterous | Comment »